Alcohol Awareness Month 2017

Every April, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) sponsors Alcohol Awareness Month. Founded and sponsored by NCADD, the month of April is dedicated to increase public awareness and understanding of alcoholism. Specifically, the stigma that prevents some people from getting the help they need.

Providing Education on Alcoholism

During Alcohol Awareness Month, NCADD, NCADD National Network of Affiliates and many other organizations educate people in local communities on the dangers of heavy drinking and alcoholism. Some of the information that the organizations want to get across include:

  • Alcoholism is a progressive, chronic disease that can be fatal if not treated.

  • Alcoholism can be successfully treated with the right balance of detox, counseling and continuing care.

  • Addiction is not a character flaw or moral weakness.

  • Alcoholism does run in families, and some people are more genetically predisposed than others.

  • What signs and symptoms may indicate a drinking problem.

  • Recognizing when it’s time to seek help, and knowing where to get help.

How to Participate in Alcohol Awareness Month

Whether you’re a recovering alcoholic or a friend/family member to a recovering alcoholic, you can do your part in participating in NCADD Alcohol Awareness Month 2017. On the website, the following materials are available for downloading:

  • 2017 Organizer’s Guide

  • Poster

  • Logo (to be used on your website or electronic materials)

There are also other ways you can contribute to this important mission:

If you are a recovering alcoholic, share your story with others. Take the next step in your support groups by becoming a mentor. Volunteer your time with others and give back to those in need, just as people donated their time to help you in early recovery. Encourage alcohol-free outings with your friends. Be a Big Brother or Big Sister and make a difference in a young person’s life.

If you are family to a recovering alcoholic, it’s just as important that you share your story. You are a testament to other families just starting their journeys. You can offer hope, inspiration and practical advice to those in need. Volunteer your time to help others, attend a support group with your loved one and continue to be a positive role model.

Alcoholism is a frightening disease, and many addicts and their families don’t know how to respond. By dispelling the myths and bringing to light the true nature of addiction and the treatment options available, we can work together to erase the stigma of alcoholism and encourage all people to get the help they need to be sober.