Are Stay-at-Home-Moms at Risk for Alcoholism?

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Drinking might be a growing problem for some stay-at-home moms (SAHMs). A quick search online will turn up plenty of blogs and articles – some serious, some not – about drinking as a SAHM. It’s difficult to tell who has a real problem with alcohol because the lines are blurred. There’s an obvious difference between a mom who has her girlfriends over for wine night once a week and a mom who is drinking daily.
Home-Moms at Risk for Alcoholism

Photo Credit: FreeImages.com/JulieElliott-Abshire

With the lines blurred and alcohol being socially acceptable, it’s not difficult for SAHMs to seek out other moms who enjoy drinking. These moms might arrange afternoon playdates with happy hour or reach for a cocktail to get them through the afternoon hours. Of course, a few drinks here and there doesn’t mean a mother is an alcoholic. But for those who might be predisposed to addiction, it’s easy to run into problems.

What are Some of the Reasons for the Increased Drinking?

Some studies have found that stay-at-home moms tend to be more depressed than moms who have full- or part-time employment. Moms who work outside the home, regardless of the hours, are generally happier and healthier. This is partly due to the fact that moms who stay home are more isolated, bored and stressed out.

Moms who are the least happy staying home seem to be most at risk for developing an alcohol problem. These moms may begin drinking to deal with the stress and isolation they are feeling. Some even admit that they believe they are “better” mothers when they drink because they are happier and more patient. Of course, this is all a mirage, as drinking has a negative impact on mothers and their children.

When Alcohol Use Crosses the Line

If you or someone you know is a SAHM with an unhealthy relationship with alcohol, it’s time to get help. Stress, boredom and feelings of being “stuck” sometimes come naturally with the role of a stay-at-home mother, but there are many healthy, constructive ways to work through them.

Libraries, park districts and YMCAs are just a few of the options for moms to connect with their peers during the day. There are also local playgroups and online communities that offer support for moms.

Serious alcohol problems need to be addressed, preferably by a women-only treatment center such as The River Source. These programs are excellent opportunities for women to empower other women and address female-specific issues such as being in the role of a stay-at-home mother. If you would like to learn more about our women-only treatment program, call us today and let’s talk!