Preventing Holiday Tragedies: Reflections on River Phoenix’s Death, 20 Years Later

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It’s been 20 years since River Phoenix died on October 31,1993 after the 23-year-old actor and musician drank a speedball of heroin and cocaine, then chased it with Valium. Phoenix spent his final hours at The Viper Room, a Hollywood nightclub that was partially owned by Johnny Depp at the time.

Phoenix’s death was highly publicized in the media. He portrayed himself as being straightlaced and beyond his years, with strong social, political, humanitarian and dietary interests; viewpoints that were not shared nor popular in the 1980s. In fact, Phoenix was dubbed as a vegan James Dean of his time.

Family of Phoenix stated that the young actor was not a regular drug user, and that his death was a result of the excitement and energy of Halloween night and coming to the city of Los Angeles to work on filming a movie, Dark Blood, a film that was finally completed in 2012. Two of Phoenix’s siblings – Joaquin and Rain – were there at the time of his death.

He had taken the speedball and Valium at some point in the evening, and then started convulsing outside the club. Emergency services were called immediately, and Phoenix was given medications to jumpstart his heart. He was transported to a nearby hospital where he was later pronounced dead at 1:51 PST on October 31, 1993.

The Viper Room continued to close each year on Halloween in remembrance of Phoenix’s death until Depp sold his share in 2004.

Addiction: Its Ability to Grab Hold of Anyone

There is no arguing with the facts: River Phoenix was a young man packed with potential in both his music and acting careers. He always presented himself as being secure in his own skin, especially for having such strong political and social views at a young age. He was a spokesperson for PETA and aided several environmental and humanitarian organizations. His untimely death shocked the nation. When his mother, Arlyn “Heart” Phoenix published a letter in the Los Angeles Times on November 24, 1993 that it was the hype and energy of Halloween and the club scene, there was no reason not to believe it.

However, some of Phoenix’s fellow actors and friends saw the early signs of addiction. In the book, Last Night at the Viper Room: River Phoenix and the Hollywood He Left Behind, friends say they saw the graying of Phoenix’s complexion, changes in his disposition and a gravitation toward the club scene. Nevertheless, the change in Phoenix’s character happened quick, and if it wasn’t for that fateful night in Los Angeles – at a hot nightclub, on an eve like Halloween – he may have been here today.

Phoenix’s death shattered a nation because he had so much to offer the world. He already had an enormous impact on Hollywood, and unfortunately, he had to leave in a heavy hearted manner, joining the list of hundreds of other actors, musicians and celebrities who met their demise with addiction.

Why Extra Caution is Needed on Holidays Like Halloween

Halloween is here, and this day is one more excuse to break away from the daily grind and have some fun. For most people, this isn’t a problem. There are more parties, more people out and about, and the bars are extra crowded. However, for an addict struggling with addiction, days like this can cause them to push their limits too far, perhaps what River Phoenix did 20 years ago.

Addicts are constantly battling their addiction, and they have no choice but to try to hide it on most days, even though close friends and family know it’s there. But, the increased partying and excitement levels that accompany holidays like Halloween can push an addict to do more drugs, or combine drugs that they wouldn’t normally have access to. While you can’t step in and control what an addict is doing, you can be more aware and enlist the help of friends or family to be on extra alert.

Of course, the deeper problem remains: addiction. Get your loved one the help they need by calling The River Source today at 1-888-687-7332. We’ve already lost too many lives over addiction from people who could still making a difference today.