Love Baseball? Here’s a Sober Game Day Guide

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It’s baseball season, which means a full summer of attending games, eating hot dogs and relaxing under the hot sun. Going to baseball games – or any sporting event for that matter – also involves a lot of tailgating and drinking. If you’re a recovering alcoholic, this can make you apprehensive about accepting an invitation. However, if you love the sport and enjoy getting out of the house, there are ways to have a great time while being sober.

Check out our tips for staying sober during this summer’s baseball games. In fact, you may find that sporting events can be added to your sobriety toolbox!

Pre-Game

  • Bring at least one sober friend with you. They can intercept if you’re tempted to drink. Plus, it’s nice to have someone who’s not drinking to talk to.

  • Create an exit strategy, and share it with your sober friend. This way, if you need to leave, you have something in place.

  • Bring along your own drinks. You’ll have guaranteed non-alcoholic drinks for the game, and it stops people from asking if you want a drink.

During the Game

  • Take breaks to step outside (if you’re indoors at a friend’s house) or to walk around the ballpark. Baseball games are long, so it’s helpful to break up your time.

  • If you are at the ballpark, check out the different food vendors or learn about the history of the venue. This can get your mind off drinking.

  • If you are at a friend’s house, spend some time with their pet (if they have one) or ask if you can bring along yours. Pets can help you relax.

  • If the festivities start heating up and you need to distract yourself, call a trusted family member, friend or your sponsor. There are also many online tools, forums and apps that allow you to connect with support.

  • Find out if the venue you’re at offers free bottled water or soda. Some ballparks offer this perk to those who sign up to be sober throughout the entire game. 

Post-Game

  • Now that the game is over, you can offer to be someone’s designated driver.

  • Stick to the original plan to leave as soon as the game is over. You don’t want to be tempted into staying longer than you prepared for.

When you have reached the point in your recovery where you are ready to join others at baseball games and other social events, the above tips will help you make a smooth transition. Over time, it will become easier to attend outings without feeling the need to drink. In the meantime, however, take things slow and gradually ease into social situations.