The River Source 12 Step Holistic Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center focuses on providing the most effective therapies and clinical approaches throughout an individual’s treatment program; this includes the use of evidence-based treatment. Evidence-based treatment integrates professional research and clinical expertise to achieve the best outcome for an individual. The River Source is a leader in the use of evidence-based treatment models that work.

How does “Evidence-Based Treatment” work?

The River Source will make decisions about an individual’s treatment based on knowledge that is backed by research, which makes it easier for us to determine the optimal treatment plan with successful outcomes for the patient. Listed below are the most commonly used behavioral therapies as evidence-based treatment at The River Source.

Behavioral Therapies:

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) was developed as a method to prevent relapse when treating problem drinking and later it was adapted for drug addicted individuals. Cognitive-behavioral strategies are based on the theory that in the development of maladaptive behavioral patterns like substance abuse, learning processes play a critical role. Individuals in CBT learn to identify and correct problematic behaviors by applying a range of different skills that can be used to stop drug abuse and to address a range of other problems that often co-occur with it.

Motivational Enhancement Therapy

Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) is a counseling approach that helps individuals resolve their ambivalence about engaging in treatment and stopping their drug use. This approach aims to evoke rapid and internally motivated change, rather than guide the patient stepwise through the recovery process. This therapy consists of an initial assessment session, followed by individual treatment sessions with a therapist. In the first treatment session, the therapist provides feedback to the initial assessment, stimulating discussion about personal substance use and eliciting self-motivational statements. Motivational interviewing principles are used to strengthen motivation and build a plan for change.

Family Behavior Therapy

Family Behavior Therapy (FBT), which has demonstrated positive results adults is aimed at addressing not only substance use problems but other co-occurring problems as well, such as conduct disorders, child mistreatment, depression, family conflict, and unemployment. FBT combines behavioral contracting with contingency management.

FBT involves the patient along with at least one significant other such as a cohabiting partner or a parent. Therapists seek to engage families in applying the behavioral strategies taught in sessions and in acquiring new skills to improve the home environment. Patients are encouraged to develop behavioral goals for preventing substance use, which are anchored to a contingency management system. Patients participate in treatment planning and goal setting from the evidence-based treatment practices.

12 Step Facilitation Therapy

Twelve-step facilitation therapy is an active engagement strategy designed to increase the likelihood of a substance abuser becoming affiliated with and actively involved in 12-step self-help groups, thereby promoting abstinence. Three key ideas predominate: (1) acceptance, which includes the realization that drug addiction is a chronic, progressive disease over which one has no control, that life has become unmanageable because of drugs, that willpower alone is insufficient to overcome the problem, and that abstinence is the only alternative; (2) surrender, which involves giving oneself over to a higher power, accepting the fellowship and support structure of other recovering addicted individuals, and following the recovery activities laid out by the 12-step program; and (3) active involvement in 12-step meetings and related activities. While the efficacy of 12-step programs (and 12-step facilitation) in treating alcohol dependence has been established, the research on its usefulness for other forms of substance abuse is more preliminary, but the treatment appears promising for helping drug abusers sustain recovery.

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse; National Institutes of Health; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services